Flutes and Conch-shells, and Expressions of Inner Joy

1.10.36

When the sun would set into the ocean in the west, overtook by evening, Hari would rest. In each place the people came to see him and give him gifts.

1.11.1

Drawing neigh to his own very prosperous city in the Land of Plenty (ānartā), he resounded upon his wondrous conch just to relieve the worries of the citizens.

2

Though the bowl of that conch was white, it became brilliantly reddened by the redness of the Great Adventurer’s lips. While resounding in the grip of his lotus-like hand, it was like a swan singing among lotuses.

The conch shell blushed when kissed by Kṛṣṇa, and radiated an exquisite beauty when touched by his hand.

3

Hearing that sound, which causes all fears to flee, all the citizens ran quickly towards it; greedy to see their protector.

Kṛṣṇa’s conch seems to act upon the residents of Dvārakā very similarly to how his flute acts upon the Gopīs. We can attempt to gain access to these sounds by listening attentively to the sound of Kīrtana.

4

They gave him many gifts, which is like giving a candle to the sun because he is self-blissful and all his desires are completely fulfilled by the his own means, incessantly.

The sun can be respected by offering it a candle. If you think about it for a second, the sun doesn’t need any extra light and neither does the person standing before the sun with the candle. The candle is not “needed” it is simply a vehicle expressing respect. This candle is exactly analogous to the actions of divine love. Neither the divine lover nor the divine beloved actually need anything, both are already completely satisfied and full by dint of divine love itself. A person in divine love is already completely fulfilled, like a person standing before the Sun is effortlessly bathed in light. In the absence of divine love’s light, all actions result from a need to cover or fill some horrible emptiness inside. The sun-drenched actions of divine love may appear very similar, but have a completely different foundation, because they exist not to fill an inner void but to express and amplify an inner fullness of joy and bliss.

5

Their faces made cheerful by love, they spoke eager and stammering words – like children to their ever-caring father.

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About Vic DiCara

Author of 27 Stars 27 Gods, Radically Deep Fundamentals of Astrology, and Beautifully Rational Philosophy of Astrology; Sanskrit translator of Bhagavad-Gītā, Bhāgavata Purāṇa, and Mādhurya Kādambinī. Bhakti-tīrtha vidyārthi at JIVA Institute of Vṛndāvana under the learned tutelage of Śrī Satyanārāyana dāsa Bābājī. Bhakti-śāstrī vidyārthi & adhyāpaka at Vṛndāvana Institute of Higher Education. …but all this doesn’t fully describe Vic. For the rest, best to meet him. Or, hypothesize it via “July 27, 1970 at 19:38 in Bay Shore New York.” View all posts by Vic DiCara

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